-OR-

Enter your bike information for available products

O.E.M. Fitment:

News

Monthly Archives: January 2018

  • Glazed and Confused

    Poor Brake Performance

    Poor brake performance got you baffled? It could be glazed brake pads and rotors.

    Top braking performance relies on friction—in other words, the brake pad’s ability to grab onto the metal brake rotor. When that ability is compromised, brake performance can go by the wayside faster than that turn entry point you just blew past.

    Healthy brake pads have a certain degree of designed-in flexibility. They are made to be soft enough to squeeze against a spinning brake rotor with great force. That pliability also makes them grip well at lower speeds and cooler temperatures. But if brakes are pushed beyond their limits, they can build up more glaze than a Dunkin’ Donut®.

    Continue reading

  • Winning! What makes top racers great.

    MX Racing

    Riders who consistently earn a spot on the podium; are they a unique breed? Are they made differently than everyone else with a special “checkered flag” gene? Or are they mere mortals who have just found how to gain an edge over every other racer?

    At SUNSTAR® and BRAKING® we spend a lot of time with racers. In fact, our BRAKING brand has been part of 113 World Titles to date … and counting! We know a thing or two about finishing first. So here are a few things we’ve learned about what it takes to be a winner on the track.

    Continue reading

  • Are your chain and sprockets really telling you all you need to know?

    chain and sprocket performanceChain of Lies

    A casual glance at your chain and sprockets may suggest that everything’s AOK in the final drive department. But a closer look could reveal hidden secrets about excessive wear that could be compromising performance and safety.

    Here are four quick ways to know the truth about the condition of your bike’s final drive.

    1. Bend and stretch

    A length of new drive chain is flexible in one direction (to easily bend around sprockets) and stiff in the other direction (side-to-side). Pinch the bike’s chain in the middle of its run between sprockets and move it side-to-side across the bike. If it moves more than an inch or so, that’s a sign of chain link wear. After extensive use and abuse, the chain’s links also become elongated with wear, resulting in larger gaps between links. This makes the chain longer (what some call chain “stretch”). If you’re close to maxing out the adjusters to achieve proper chain tension, then you’re probably looking at a well-worn chain. And, while chain links stretch with wear, sprockets do not, resulting a misalignment of the chain’s links and the sprocket’s teeth. Try pulling the chain away from the teeth at the rear of the back sprocket. If you see separation, then the chain is toast

    Continue reading

3 Item(s)

Loading...
Please wait...